Archive for February, 2010

Whirlwind of Philly Tea Events

Tea: A Mirror of Soul:

an opera at the Academy of Music

Wednesday, Feb 24 * Friday, Feb  26 * Sunday, Feb 28 (matinee)

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5

The best tea book is about perfume

Sadly enough, “Perfumes: The Guide” is so consistently brilliant that I refuse to quote portions of it.  There are countless epigrammatic masterpieces in here, and any one paragraph I might omit out of necessity could emerge as history’s paragon of the written word.  I can imagine future historians reading this post, puzzling at the barbarian who quoted the “Osmanthus Yunnan” review, seemingly blind to the luminosity of “Bergamote 22.”  Indeed, the only way I could bring myself to select two arbitrary perfumes for the construction of the previous sentence was by browsing for the tiny subset of those with tea-related names.  You’ll have to browse for excerpts yourself.

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Tovolo TeaGo Tea Press Review

I have lots to share about the Specialty Tea Institute class I took over a week ago, but I had to sneak this in while my disappointment was still fresh.

Is that a TeaGo in your pocket or--never mind.

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The Sun: cheap labor for tea

If you are deadly serious about tea, you probably know about Tea: Cultivation to Consumption, edited by K.C. Willson and M.N Clifford and published by Chapman and Hall in 1991.  This 769 page monolith, a compendium of scholarly articles about all aspects of tea, is far and away the most comprehensive text on tea I have ever seen.  I’m going to paraphrase one of the articles, about solar radiation, in order to address some issues about harvesting that were raised in my last post.  This is going to sound stupid, because I’m paraphrasing a book I don’t currently have at my disposal.  I borrowed it once from a university library halfway across the state, but it’s proved elusive to purchase.  If I get my hands on this book again, I’ll fill in the information missing here–like the author’s name.

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